Curriculum

Curriculum2021-03-23T14:44:08+00:00

An Uninterrupted Work-Cycle

Children need time and space in order to develop the necessary executive functions to be able to concentrate. This happens very early in life. The use of modern technology means that we often do not have to concentrate for very long in order to be able to get information about a topic, videos can help us quickly understand a difficult topic, a Whatsapp message tells us how our family is doing and even our fridge or washing machine lets us know when they need our attention!

This can make it difficult to develop the patience and concentration span necessary in order to persevere at something challenging. Dr. Montessori believed that we need to protect a child’s work environment so that they can learn to work in peace and concentrate and explore the materials fully. For this reason we prioritise uninterrupted work cycles in both Infant Community and Children’s House.

An Uninterrupted Work-Cycle

Children need time and space in order to develop the necessary executive functions to be able to concentrate. This happens very early in life. The use of modern technology means that we often do not have to concentrate for very long in order to be able to get information about a topic, videos can help us quickly understand a difficult topic, a Whatsapp message tells us how our family is doing and even our fridge or washing machine lets us know when they need our attention!

This can make it difficult to develop the patience and concentration span necessary in order to persevere at something challenging. Dr. Montessori believed that we need to protect a child’s work environment so that they can learn to work in peace and concentrate and explore the materials fully. For this reason we prioritise uninterrupted work cycles in both Infant Community and Children’s House.

Early years

Our Infant Community spaces are designed to help young children grow and develop. Children from 15 months until 3 years of age will form part of the Infant Community environments.

The Infant Community fosters independence, promotes positive relationships and supports children in their social, emotional and physical development.

The Children’s House is for children aged between 3 and 6 years old. The environment builds on skills developed in the Infant Community and at the same time, encourages sensorial exploration, communication and creativity.

“Every child deserves the best possible start in life and support to their full potential. A child’s experience in the early years has a major impact on their future life chances. A secure safe and happy childhood is important in its own right, and it provides the foundation for children to make the most of their abilities and talents as they grow up. When parents choose to use early years services they want to know the provision will keep their children safe and help them to thrive. The Early Years Foundation Stage is the framework that provides that assurance.”

Early years

Our Infant Community spaces are designed to help young children grow and develop. Children from 15 months until 3 years of age will form part of the Infant Community environments.

The Infant Community fosters independence, promotes positive relationships and supports children in their social, emotional and physical development.

The Children’s House is for children aged between 3 and 6 years old. The environment builds on skills developed in the Infant Community and at the same time, encourages sensorial exploration, communication and creativity.

“Every child deserves the best possible start in life and support to their full potential. A child’s experience in the early years has a major impact on their future life chances. A secure safe and happy childhood is important in its own right, and it provides the foundation for children to make the most of their abilities and talents as they grow up. When parents choose to use early years services they want to know the provision will keep their children safe and help them to thrive. The Early Years Foundation Stage is the framework that provides that assurance.”

Childhood

Childhood

Cosmic Education

Montessori (1949) believed that the role of the educator was to bring about peace in a society, and to do that she realised that children need to see the bigger picture and understand their place within the world. They need to understand how the different areas of their world link together, in order to understand why no creature can live as an individual and why interconnectedness provides the sustenance for life.
But what is a cosmic education?
Traditionally, we have always taught children about science, mathematics, history, art and languages, and these are all covered in a Montessori Cosmic Education. We just have to imagine a slightly different way of doing this.
A Cosmic Education involves looking at all the different areas of our cosmos and seeing the interconnections between them. The five Great Lessons are key to introducing the cosmic education. These five lessons are revisited regularly in order to visit different topic areas and subjects. They act as a spring board and lead children to discover more about the topics they hear in the stories.
The first is The Coming of the Universe and Earth where we take a journey to the stars! Having been inspired by this children go on to explore our solar system and earth. They visit topics such as the planets, weather and the rock cycle. Areas of physics and chemistry, such as gravity, energy and states of matter, help children to move towards a more abstract way of thinking. We learn about history through the ice age and different eras of the earth and we study geography and geology in order to make sense of our planet.
The Second Great Lesson is the Coming of Life, and with life comes biology. After our story of the timeline of life we study all different forms of biology, from the micro to the macroscopic. We look at how life has evolved and at the different needs of all forms of life. Interdependence between living forms is a key topic and we use the fossil record to help understand different species which did not survive.

Cosmic Education

Montessori (1949) believed that the role of the educator was to bring about peace in a society, and to do that she realised that children need to see the bigger picture and understand their place within the world. They need to understand how the different areas of their world link together, in order to understand why no creature can live as an individual and why interconnectedness provides the sustenance for life.
But what is a cosmic education?
Traditionally, we have always taught children about science, mathematics, history, art and languages, and these are all covered in a Montessori Cosmic Education. We just have to imagine a slightly different way of doing this.
A Cosmic Education involves looking at all the different areas of our cosmos and seeing the interconnections between them. The five Great Lessons are key to introducing the cosmic education. These five lessons are revisited regularly in order to visit different topic areas and subjects. They act as a spring board and lead children to discover more about the topics they hear in the stories.
The first is The Coming of the Universe and Earth where we take a journey to the stars! Having been inspired by this children go on to explore our solar system and earth. They visit topics such as the planets, weather and the rock cycle. Areas of physics and chemistry, such as gravity, energy and states of matter, help children to move towards a more abstract way of thinking. We learn about history through the ice age and different eras of the earth and we study geography and geology in order to make sense of our planet.
The Second Great Lesson is the Coming of Life, and with life comes biology. After our story of the timeline of life we study all different forms of biology, from the micro to the macroscopic. We look at how life has evolved and at the different needs of all forms of life. Interdependence between living forms is a key topic and we use the fossil record to help understand different species which did not survive.
When we look at the Third Lesson: The Coming of Human Beings, we take a closer look at what makes us special; our minds, our hands and our ability to love. Through these key areas, children are inspired to look more deeply to see how civilisations and societies developed. From ancient civilisations to modern history, children look at key events that have helped shape the world we live in today. Looking at different cultures and social studies and innovation allow children to develop respect for others. Revisiting some of the science we saw following the first lessons, but this time from the point of view of the scientists who made the discoveries.
The Fourth Great Lesson is one of communication. The Story of Writing allows us to understand better the incredible ability that humans have to record their thoughts on paper. This leads to the study of foreign languages, past and present, both in terms of the languages spoken and the stories told. Children learn a deeper understanding of the syntax of their own languages, and the similarities and differences between them.
The final story is that of Numbers. We journey through time to see the reasons that people need to count, from early civilisations who counted with 1, 2 and many, to the current day. We look at how and why we store information about numbers, from keeping track of sheep to saving money in a bank account. Naturally, this leads to the study of fractions, decimals and percentages, geometry and the application of maths to solve problems.
The stories are referred to on a regular basis throughout the year, and are designed to inspire rather than govern the topics that follow. A child’s interest may be sparked by The Coming of Life and decide to research Polar Bears. Naturally, they will learn about other species, interdependence, climate and much more. The teacher will present new lessons in order to help to scaffold the child’s understanding of the different areas that their research takes them to.
A cosmic education encourages children to understand themselves as individuals, as members of a society and as global citizens, with rights and responsibilities. The Great Lessons of Cosmic Education help children to understand the connections between different areas of the curriculum, so that history, culture, science and the environment area seen as interconnected subjects, not those separated by teacher and defined by the time of day.
When the Fundamental Needs of Human Beings forms a major part of all areas of the curriculum, morality is discussed, through peaceful communication, on a regular basis. Montessori believed that a cosmic education could restore harmony and order, thereby allowing people to reach their true potential.
“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind”
When we look at the Third Lesson: The Coming of Human Beings, we take a closer look at what makes us special; our minds, our hands and our ability to love. Through these key areas, children are inspired to look more deeply to see how civilisations and societies developed. From ancient civilisations to modern history, children look at key events that have helped shape the world we live in today. Looking at different cultures and social studies and innovation allow children to develop respect for others. Revisiting some of the science we saw following the first lessons, but this time from the point of view of the scientists who made the discoveries.
The Fourth Great Lesson is one of communication. The Story of Writing allows us to understand better the incredible ability that humans have to record their thoughts on paper. This leads to the study of foreign languages, past and present, both in terms of the languages spoken and the stories told. Children learn a deeper understanding of the syntax of their own languages, and the similarities and differences between them.
The final story is that of Numbers. We journey through time to see the reasons that people need to count, from early civilisations who counted with 1, 2 and many, to the current day. We look at how and why we store information about numbers, from keeping track of sheep to saving money in a bank account. Naturally, this leads to the study of fractions, decimals and percentages, geometry and the application of maths to solve problems.
The stories are referred to on a regular basis throughout the year, and are designed to inspire rather than govern the topics that follow. A child’s interest may be sparked by The Coming of Life and decide to research Polar Bears. Naturally, they will learn about other species, interdependence, climate and much more. The teacher will present new lessons in order to help to scaffold the child’s understanding of the different areas that their research takes them to.
A cosmic education encourages children to understand themselves as individuals, as members of a society and as global citizens, with rights and responsibilities. The Great Lessons of Cosmic Education help children to understand the connections between different areas of the curriculum, so that history, culture, science and the environment area seen as interconnected subjects, not those separated by teacher and defined by the time of day.
When the Fundamental Needs of Human Beings forms a major part of all areas of the curriculum, morality is discussed, through peaceful communication, on a regular basis. Montessori believed that a cosmic education could restore harmony and order, thereby allowing people to reach their true potential.
“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind”

Montessori Football

Montessori Football

“In the last decade I’ve observed the greatest football academies and many recreational clubs around the world and studied the empirical data. I’ve concluded that in this football world it is not about the child, but it is about the coach, the result, the parent or the club. Fortunately there is an environment that is prepared for the enormous benefits of this great game, and that is the Montessori environment.”

Ruben Jongkind – Founder / CEO Montessori Football

Barcelona Montessori School will also offer a sport curriculum which unique within Europe; Montessori Sports.

The curriculum is certified by the AMI, this is the first time in over a 100 years that the AMI have approved an extension of curriculum. It is designed to teach the fundamentals and benefits of sports through self awareness, body control, team work and mental preparation, without the competition aspect to sport. 

The formation will take place during the month of August and will concern all of our AMI trained staff, it will be run by Ruben Jongkind himself. After the training we will send videos back to Montessori Football staff so that they can check we’re doing the exercises the way they should be. The formation and the activities will evolve as the children grow and the primary children will play regular games of football once they’re level will be good enough.

Montessori sports already have plans for other sports such as Tennis, Basket and more. As of now Montessori football will only be available to the children of our school but we are not against the idea of offering after school Montessori football club later down the line.The plans for our garden currently involve space for greenery, plants and trees. Visitors might be surprised to know that these plans will not change greatly and we certainly do not need to add a football pitch. Instead we will be adapting the current plans so that children can develop their football skills alongside nature.

Montessori Sports

“In the last decade I’ve observed the greatest football academies and many recreational clubs around the world and studied the empirical data. I’ve concluded that in this football world it is not about the child, but it is about the coach, the result, the parent or the club. Fortunately there is an environment that is prepared for the enormous benefits of this great game, and that is the Montessori environment.”

Ruben Jongkind – Founder / CEO Montessori Football

Barcelona Montessori School will also offer a sport curriculum which unique within Europe; Montessori Sports.

The curriculum is certified by the AMI, this is the first time in over a 100 years that the AMI have approved an extension of curriculum. It is designed to teach the fundamentals and benefits of sports through self awareness, body control, team work and mental preparation, without the competition aspect to sport. 

The formation will take place during the month of August and will concern all of our AMI trained staff, it will be run by Ruben Jongkind himself. After the training we will send videos back to Montessori Football staff so that they can check we’re doing the exercises the way they should be. The formation and the activities will evolve as the children grow and the primary children will play regular games of football once they’re level will be good enough.

Montessori sports already have plans for other sports such as Tennis, Basket and more. As of now Montessori football will only be available to the children of our school but we are not against the idea of offering after school Montessori football club later down the line.The plans for our garden currently involve space for greenery, plants and trees. Visitors might be surprised to know that these plans will not change greatly and we certainly do not need to add a football pitch. Instead we will be adapting the current plans so that children can develop their football skills alongside nature.

Montessori Sports

Who is Ruben Jongkind?

Ruben Jongkind is the man behind the Talent Development of the Academy at AFC Ajax Amsterdam, that lead to the revolutionary team that went all the way to the semi finals last year at the champions league. He is behind Frenkie de Jong and Matthijs de Ligt and the co-writer of the Plan Cruyff.

More about him here and there.

“Tennis, football and the like do not have for their sole purpose the accurate moving of a ball but they challenge us to acquire a new skill -something lacking before – and this feeling of enhancing our abilities is the real source of delight in the game”

Maria Montessori (Absorbent Mind, chapter 17)

Who is Ruben Jongkind?

Ruben Jongkind is the man behind the Talent Development of the Academy at AFC Ajax Amsterdam, that lead to the revolutionary team that went all the way to the semi finals last year at the champions league. He is behind Frenkie de Jong and Matthijs de Ligt and the co-writer of the Plan Cruyff.

More about him here and there.

“Tennis, football and the like do not have for their sole purpose the accurate moving of a ball but they challenge us to acquire a new skill -something lacking before – and this feeling of enhancing our abilities is the real source of delight in the game”

Maria Montessori (Absorbent Mind, chapter 17)

Forest School

Forest School

Let the children be free; Encourage them; Let them run outside when it is raining; Let them remove their shoes when they find a puddle of water; and, when the grass of the meadows is damp with dew, let them run on it and trample it with their bare feet; Let them rest peacefully when a tree invites them to sleep beneath its’ shade; let them shout and laugh when the sun wakes them in the morning as it wakes every living creature that divides its day between waking and sleeping.

Maria Montessori

Forest Schooling is an educational method which makes an ideal compliment to the Montessori philosophy. Forest Schooling is a long-term process involving regular activities which support not only the child’s understanding of the natural world, but also foster a sense of community amongst those in the group. The children’s physical, cognitive, linguistic, social and emotional development is enhanced through a range of short and long-term learning opportunities related to the outdoors. These are practical activities which children can engage with on a number of levels.

Forest schooling begins in the school grounds, where the same group of children meet to work towards building sustainable, environmentally friendly attitudes towards the outdoor space. The children will plan, implement, nurture and care for plants which grow around us. We will experience first hand, not only the needs of the different plants and animals in our local environment, but also any risks that are associated with the jobs we need to do. The dedicated forest schooling time will give children the opportunity to immerse themselves in these activities. The fact that these plants are onsite, means that children can continue to care for these and enjoy the fruits of their labour, throughout the day.

As children become more confident and develop a better understanding of the natural world, we will begin to make regular excursions to the local forest. These will be by public transport and encourage children to develop a whole new set of plans and risk evaluation. By allowing children to engage and develop their own connection with the natural world around them, we hope to inspire children to develop confidence, independence and a respect for their wider community.

When children come into contact with nature, they reveal their strength.

Maria Montessori

Let the children be free; Encourage them; Let them run outside when it is raining; Let them remove their shoes when they find a puddle of water; and, when the grass of the meadows is damp with dew, let them run on it and trample it with their bare feet; Let them rest peacefully when a tree invites them to sleep beneath its’ shade; let them shout and laugh when the sun wakes them in the morning as it wakes every living creature that divides its day between waking and sleeping.

Maria Montessori

Forest Schooling is an educational method which makes an ideal compliment to the Montessori philosophy. Forest Schooling is a long-term process involving regular activities which support not only the child’s understanding of the natural world, but also foster a sense of community amongst those in the group. The children’s physical, cognitive, linguistic, social and emotional development is enhanced through a range of short and long-term learning opportunities related to the outdoors. These are practical activities which children can engage with on a number of levels.

Forest schooling begins in the school grounds, where the same group of children meet to work towards building sustainable, environmentally friendly attitudes towards the outdoor space. The children will plan, implement, nurture and care for plants which grow around us. We will experience first hand, not only the needs of the different plants and animals in our local environment, but also any risks that are associated with the jobs we need to do. The dedicated forest schooling time will give children the opportunity to immerse themselves in these activities. The fact that these plants are onsite, means that children can continue to care for these and enjoy the fruits of their labour, throughout the day.

As children become more confident and develop a better understanding of the natural world, we will begin to make regular excursions to the local forest. These will be by public transport and encourage children to develop a whole new set of plans and risk evaluation. By allowing children to engage and develop their own connection with the natural world around them, we hope to inspire children to develop confidence, independence and a respect for their wider community.

When children come into contact with nature, they reveal their strength.

Maria Montessori

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